Archive | January 2012

Coconut flour

I’ve always wanted to try coconut flour, very expensive but much healthier choice I believe. It doesn’t substitute equally as an article I just read states that it swells up like 3 times it’s volume. It also does not contain gluten as wheat does, so it doesn’t make a sticky bond to hold baked goods together. I have never tried any gluten free recipes but I think I am going to start learning how to as my allergies are bad right now in central Texas the mold is off the charts! and anything that can make my digestion better will help.

Anyhow, this is what I got from the article and the link to it is at the bottom.

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Unlike most commercial flours that are high in carbohydrates, the majority (58%) of the carbohydrate content of coconut flour comes in fiber.  By contrast, wheat bran, a more traditional high-fiber source, is only 27 percent fiber. So, how does coconut flour stack up overall? Let’s take a look:

Coconut flour (1 cup) Whole wheat flour (1 cup)
Calories 480 kcal 440 kcal
Fat 12 g 2 g
Carbohydrates 80 g 84 g
Fiber 48 g 8 g
Protein 16 g 16 g

Now you’ll probably be thinking “damn, apart from the fiber content, coconut flour seems pretty much like whole wheat flour”. You’d think that… except when you cook with coconut flour, it swells up more than a bodybuilder the day after hitting up a Chinese buffet.

In other words, coconut flour provides a huge volumizing effect with a minimal caloric and carbohydrate cost.

In fact, 1 cup of coconut flour seems to make as many muffins as does 3 cups of wheat flour, so we can operate under the working assumption that it also provides 2/3 fewer calories.

coconut flour muffin 300x225 recipe carbohydrate

Same great taste, now less filling!

Now, before you start swapping coconut flour into every carbohydrate-based recipe you can think of, I gotta warn you: coconut flour is gluten free.

This makes coconut flour awesome from a physique perspective but garbage from a “keeping your meals from falling apart” perspective. Therefore, if you are going to make coconut flour part of your diet, you are going to need a couple of suggestions of how best to start.

read full article

http://graemethomasonline.com/coconut-flour-a-figure-athletes-best-friend/

Can you eat lots of fat and lose weight? Yes, with coconuts!

I read somewhere that coconut is good for you even though it is saturated, yes saturated with saturated fats!  I just came across another articles that explains why the saturated fat of coconut is actually not detrimental to your health and actually has antiviral properties and can even help you lose weight!

check this out

 

Sometime in the middle of the last century, coconuts and coconut oil really started to fall out of favor due to their high saturated fat content. As everyone knows <cough, cough> high intakes of saturated fats cause heart disease.

This statement might make sense if we conveniently ignore the fact that coconuts have long been a dietary staple of tropical nations due to their high-energy content and amazing versatility, yet the incidence of heart disease among tropical nations is often lower than that of North Americans.

Even though 92% of the fat in coconuts is saturated, the majority is made up of the medium-chain triglycerides caprylic, capric and lauric acids. These medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) are absorbed differently than long-chain fatty acids and there is evidence in human weight loss trials that diets higher in medium chain triglycerides can contribute to greater fat loss.1,2,3

Not only might MCTs contribute to greater fat loss, but research continues to emerge questioning the supposed link between saturated fat intake and the progression of heart disease4,5. Thankfully, we are starting to wise-up to the fact that natural saturated fats are not going to immediately cause you to drop dead but are, by and large, health promoting.

But coconuts are about so much more than just their oil, which incidentally is both wondrously healthy and remarkably heat stable; making it by far the #1 choice for cooking.

Coconuts also contain a significant amount of fiber. And as we know, fiber is both necessary for keeping you regular and full when going through a period of caloric restriction.

Coconut Flour and You

Unlike most commercial flours that are high in carbohydrates, the majority (58%) of the carbohydrate content of coconut flour comes in fiber.  By contrast, wheat bran, a more traditional high-fiber source, is only 27 percent fiber. So, how does coconut flour stack up overall? Let’s take a look:

Coconut flour (1 cup) Whole wheat flour (1 cup)
Calories 480 kcal 440 kcal
Fat 12 g 2 g
Carbohydrates 80 g 84 g
Fiber 48 g 8 g
Protein 16 g 16 g

 

Now you’ll probably be thinking “damn, apart from the fiber content, coconut flour seems pretty much like whole wheat flour”. You’d think that… except when you cook with coconut flour, it swells up more than a bodybuilder the day after hitting up a Chinese buffet.

In other words, coconut flour provides a huge volumizing effect with a minimal caloric and carbohydrate cost.

In fact, 1 cup of coconut flour seems to make as many muffins as does 3 cups of wheat flour, so we can operate under the working assumption that it also provides 2/3 fewer calories.

coconut flour muffin 300x225 recipe carbohydrate

A word about coconut milk and cooking

I love to use coconut milk in cooking and baking. I find that the canned coconut milk is good in Thai Curry Soup as it adds a lot of thickness due to the addition of guar gum. It is also very good in the Egg Nog recipe I posted. However, it doesn’t do so well in baking as it adds too much weight. So, therefore, I make my own milk using coconut powder that you can find at any Indian or Oriental grocery store. Use about 90 g ( approx 3 oz) per 8 oz of water. Put the coconut in a saucepan and add 8 oz of water. Bring to a simmer. Turn heat off and let it steep. Then strain it using a fine mesh strainer. It still is wonderfully rich and creamy but without the sugar or guar gum or preservatives. Use the strained coconut powder in macaroon or other recipes which you would add coconut too!

coconut flour

coconut and health

Black Pepper Fettuccine with Chardonnay Sauce and Grilled Asparagus

Black Pepper Fettuccine with Chardonnay Sauce and Grilled Asparagus
SERVES 2 | 30 MINUTES OR FEWER

This is a recipe I found online as part of an article done by Vegetarian Times magazine about Raven’s Restaurant belonging to Stanford Inn by the Sea, my dream vacation!!!!
“We created the Chardonnay sauce to be creamy and flavorful, arousing the senses,” Jeff Stanford says. Ravens’ serves house-made pasta; VT adapted the recipe to use dried fettuccine. Keep extra sauce in the fridge up to five days.

Okay Jeff… this was good, but after making a few adjustments, for example the addition of garlic, a bit of onion, coconut milk (for extra creaminess), and upping the nutritional yeast, plus adding a pinch of marjoram (after all, this is an Italian dish!),  I also marinated the asparagus in olive oil, a bit of lime and salt and pepper before grilling.  You can see my recipe alteration here.

SAUCE

1 cup raw cashews

1 cup Chardonnay wine

1 Tbs. nutritional yeast

1 Tbs. lemon juice

11/2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper

PASTA

3 oz. uncooked fettuccine

1 cup baby spinach

6 asparagus spears (1/4 lb.)

1/4 red bell pepper, cut into thin strips

1. To make Sauce: Blend cashews and 1 cup water in blender or food processor until smooth. Strain out solids using fine mesh strainer; discard solids.

2. Simmer Chardonnay in small saucepan over medium heat 7 to 10 minutes, or until reduced to approximately 1/3 cup liquid. Stir in cashew mixture, nutritional yeast, lemon juice, and ground black pepper. Keep warm.

3. To make Pasta: cook fettuccine in boiling salted water according to package directions.

4. Meanwhile, bring 1/4 cup water to a simmer in small skillet. Add spinach, and cook 2 to 3 minutes, or until wilted. Keep warm.

5. Heat grill pan over medium heat. Grill asparagus 7 minutes, turning once. Grill bell pepper strips 2 minutes, or until wilted. Keep warm.

6. Drain fettuccine, and return to pot. Toss with Sauce, and divide between 2 plates. Top each serving with wilted spinach, asparagus, and bell pepper strips.

PER SERVING (3/4 CUP PASTA TOSSED WITH 1/4 CUP SAUCE AND VEGETABLES): 386 CAL; 15 G PROT; 16 G TOTAL FAT (3 G SAT FAT); 49 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 184 MG SOD; 5 G FIBER; 6 G SUGARS

https://kindcooking.wordpress.com/2012/02/17/black-pepper-fettuccine-with-chardonnay-sauce-and-grilled-asparagus-improved/